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Visualising the interconnectedness of all things 15 January 2015

Posted by cooperatoby in cooperative, Leeds, Social enterprise.
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Twitter just alerted me to the existence of Wikigraph, a brilliant tool which shows the shortest path between two Wikipedia entries – and all the other pages they and the intervening links connect to. Here’s how close Suma is to being a social enterprise:
Wikigraph

The EU – unimaginably good value for money 18 November 2013

Posted by cooperatoby in EU.
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When they use it as an echo chamber to magnify the sound of their own voices, nationalist politicians only succeed in showing how important Europe is to us. It’s unimaginably good value for money. Here’s a graph showing the relationship between the economies of the EU countries, their government budgets, the EU’s collective budget, and the cost of administering the EU. How could we ask for less?EU budget in proportion

See EU budget – fact and myths

Inexplicably popular posts 28 September 2013

Posted by cooperatoby in journalism, Uncategorized.
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An introspective recursive post – a chart showing my top posts.

Why do things ‘trend’? What little can we learn?

– personal recommendation is the biggest factor

– a fairly literal title

– people like photos

– referrals from other sites can make a big difference (how otherwise to explain the popularity of a 4-year-old post about trams in Antalya?) but you can’t tell where on earth these come from.
130928 blog reads chart

130928 blog reads origin

Spaceship Social Economy 24 November 2012

Posted by cooperatoby in EU, social economy, Social enterprise.
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The Better Future for the Social Economy (BFSE) network has created this charming diagram of what the social economy needs from the ESF.
it can be found as the centrefold of the network’s booklet A Better Future.
I hope that the partnership agreements and operational programmes for the 2014-2020 programming period that are now being dreamt up – apparently in behind-closed-doors bilateral negotiations – will make all these things possible. Europe needs them!

Blue exclamation mark 9 November 2012

Posted by cooperatoby in EU.
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Here’s a lovely map showing the results of the EU’s Regional Innovation Strategies survey, sent round by the Enterprise DG. The blue regions are the most innovative and the red the least (no relation to the electoral map of the USA).

EU’s innovative regions – RIS 2012


we used to hear about a blue banana of prosperity. This looks more like a blue exclamation mark.

Eric Fischer’s Twitter and Flickr Maps 30 October 2012

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Prepare to be amazed:

Eric Fischer's Twitter and Flickr Maps.

Work and play networks 30 October 2012

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Quantity and quality
The big thing that my LinkedIn network map doesn’t show is the quality of the relationships. I have to admit that in the case of LinkedIn this isn’t very high with me – at the moment it is limited to taking a mild interest in what people are doing, and adding a few well-chosen comments to as discussion now and then (for instance on the rightness of British canals being given over to a charity rather than a ‘mutual’ as the government miscalls it. Of course the charity could spawn subsidiary social enterprises). Whereas with Facebook the ‘bandwidth’ is much broader – it is populated with a lot of photos and jokes and is interactive in more unpredictable ways. This is a drawback as well as an advantage, as Simon was saying on Sunday. With Facebook you get a steady or rather an erratic – flow of enjoyable surprises – it is good for stimulating unexpected thoughts. It is ludic and serendipitous, which I like. The downside to this is that you don’t know what you’re missing – FB’s relevance engine filters things and doesn’t tell you how – so for instance Truus gets my utterances but I seem not to get hers.
Whereas somehow LinkedIn is hard work – it has a serious face, it’s about “getting on” in the world. And I don’t like to divide those sides of myself up too rigidly. I like to work at what I believe in, so that work is creative and builds something, and is not a loss of time but an enrichment of time – co-operation is an expression of this. My previous post revealed that my Facebook ffriends fall into this work/play dichotomy (currently at least – I’m waiting for it to change). With LinkedIn the dichotomy is vertical – the work layer is visible and the play layer is hidden underneath.
Fragmentation or layering?
I’d been thinking that the future for FB was inevitably one of fission and fragmentation – that as the whole world joined (we are already 1/6 of the way there) then it would become less and less useful, and that ‘walled gardens’ and premium networks would come back into fashion. What is in fact happening is a sort of vertical segmentation, with the idea of ‘close friends’ and so on, pinched from Google+. This is very welcome as it will increase transparency and predictability.
I haven’t yet become comfortable with Twitter – and as I ramble on maybe that’s as it should be. But I’m capable of concision so maybe that will change too!

LinkedIn network map 29 October 2012

Posted by cooperatoby in Uncategorized.
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LinkedIn has a network mapping tool too, and it’s very pretty. It’s fairly predictable, the way I have 6 clusters of connections plus a few single unattached individuals – but the thing it brings to my mind most is the people who AREN’T there – the gaps in the network. I suppose some people are just like that. Some of them are in my Facebook network map, so now I want to merge the two of them. This is only the first-level network of course. If we had more dimensions we could show deeper levels – contacts-of-contacts.

As an afterthought, the map seem to show that the co-operators (in blue on the right) are a very cohesive network among themselves – more densely interconnected than my other work-related communities. I suppose that’s because co-operation is more than just a job.

My two social networks 27 October 2012

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I’ve just discovered (after tens of thousands of other people) that the computation engine Wolfram|Alpha will do an amazing analysis of your Facebook usage if only you type ‘Facebook report’ into its search box. It calculates reams of information such as how many links you upload, what time of day you log in, who comments on your entries, where they say they live and what they say their birthdays are. It produces some amazing charts too, including a wordcloud of your comments (my most common word is ‘economic’).

Wolfram|Alpha network analysis of my Facebook friends

This is the best chart – a network analysis of my 91 Facebook friends. Reader, you can see that you fall into one of 4 main clusters. The salient fact though is that my ‘ffriends’ are rigidly divided into two worlds – work and family – no one bridges the gap. The co-operative world makes up the top half of the chart, with the British side in orange on the left and the European side in khaki on the right – linked by CECOP and Vivian. Brussels Labour is the outlier top left and COPIE & AEIDL are top right. Truus’s family is in blue bottom left, and my family in green bottom centre, linked by Truus herself, Zanna and Liana. Way over on the right are 3 old friends from Suma. Finally as is inevitable for a dumb computer, some people are in the wrong place – and so Ian Symonds has attached himself to Truus’s family.

It’s a fascinating diagram. I wonder whether the two halves of my schizophrenic existence will ever connect to each other? And if only WordPress had similar analytics.

Size is relative 8 February 2011

Posted by cooperatoby in cooperative.
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I was delighted to find that my old co-op Suma is now the country’s 52st biggest (by turnover, £26m) according to the Co-operatives UK Top 100 . I was even happier that it gets a mention in David McCandless’s amazing new book of infographics, The Visual Miscellaneum. It is on page 183 on the Organic Food Market, where it is relegated to footnote status by corporations like Philip Morris, Dean Foods (who?) and Heinz. There’s still some way to go before we take over the world, then.

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