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Bremain 18 June 2016

Posted by cooperatoby in EU, Uncategorized.
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Of course I’ve become infuriated and dismayed by the referendum campaign, and doubt that even Jo Cox’s incomprehensible murder will bring campaigners to their senses.
Of course also I’m something of a Brussels insider – but this is a rational choice, by a political refugee from Thatcher, you might say.
I’ve been dismayed by one of my oldest friends teetering on the brink of voting ‘out’ because he sees the EU as undemocratic (people who live in glass houses…) or – an argument even harder to counter – not up to the job of world unification (but it’s the best approach we have). I’ve been annoyed by facetious French calls that Britain should just go away and leave Europe alone (playing with fire). And I’m intrigued to wonder how much the referendum result will matter: whichever way it goes the Tory party will be riven down the middle so the sniping will go on. I’ve been given pause for thought by being called a ‘transnationalist’ in the ESF community, as if transnationality was something odd, rather than being the raison d’être of it all.
Multi-level governance and subsidiarity are complex arguments to make. It seems to me that the popular sentiment against ‘Europe’ is a matter of displacement, a sleight of hand by the UK’s own politicians. The government has hollowed out democratic accountability, stripped local government of its relevance though centralisation and privatisation, so that people have lost their sense of agency. The country they “want back” has been stolen from them not by Brussels but by Westminster.

Mission-led business – building another half-way house 13 June 2016

Posted by cooperatoby in Social enterprise.
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The British government is trying to consolidate a newly-defined sector of what it defines rather broadly as the ‘social economy’.

It has coined the term ‘mission-led business’ (MLBs) to fit between social enterprise and corporate social responsibility. The definition is stronger than the latter in that it ‘identifies an intention to have a positive social impact as a central purpose of its business; makes a long-term or binding commitment to deliver on that intention through its business and operations; and reports on its social impact to its stakeholders’ – but weaker than the former because it ‘can fully distribute its profits’.

Rob Wilson, the UK’s Minister for Civil Society, has published a call for evidence on MLBs, saying: “I want every UK entrepreneur to be able to easily establish a business that makes a good profit while at the same time making a commitment to social impact. And I want everyone – consumers, governments and companies – to integrate mission-led businesses into their buying and investing habits.”

This initiative thus seeks to give an identity to businesses which want to a have a positive social impact – and who doesn’t? – but whose investors are unwilling to share any profit or power with other stakeholders. The definition is silent not only about ownership and participation, but also about the distribution of profits or assets. It relies solely on good intentions and social reporting.

The evidence will be considered by an advisory panel led by Nigel Wilson, CEO of Legal & General, but which has no representation from co-operatives, social enterprises or charities.

To comment, before 8 July 2016, go to: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/mission-led-business-review-call-for-evidence See the Pioneer Post report at: https://www.pioneerspost.com/news-views/20160512/global-social-innovation-round-34

See Senscot post – thanks Alison Lamond in Facebook Worker co-operatives group.

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